Dunaskin Street

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Dunaskin Street

Postby Lone Groover » Sun Nov 25, 2007 11:18 am

My better half grew up in Dunaskin Street. Apart from the Church & the flour mill it is completely changed although the shape of the road remains the same.

Any chance one of the HG chaps has got any photos of this street? - A nostalgia kind of thing. Thanks for looking.

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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby HollowHorn » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:15 pm

Life around the mill in Partick and in Dunaskin Street (was also known as Newton Street) was something children of today would not know or understand. I should know I had hundreds of stories told to me by my great grandmother. We all lived there(Dunaskin St/Church Street and the mill) in two rows of tenements now gone. I guess not too many people know that Dunaskin (Newton St) was built on a grave yard. Not the small grave yard mentioned in the newsletter here. I remember going down to the factors office to pay my great gran's rent and looking at the rent book and seeing a name and city and country as to who owned the buildings then. From New York, USA. Sorry this is such a long email but when I see and hear what has been happening to the people I knew and their accommodation it must be very frightening for the old people that are left with only memories. regards Cate.

http://www.glasgowwestend.co.uk/out/partickstory.php


Anyone have info on the 'graveyard'?

http://www.hiddenglasgow.com/forums/vie ... &sk=t&sd=a
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby HollowHorn » Tue Nov 27, 2007 7:25 pm

From 1929, showing Newton St. which later became Dunaskin St:
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby Lone Groover » Tue Nov 27, 2007 8:09 pm

Hollowhorn - you are perilously close to earning yourself a pint in the 3 Judges - :D

This road was also known as "The Quarry" - We don't know why.
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby HollowHorn » Tue Nov 27, 2007 10:05 pm

It's very frustrating, LG, can't find a good photo anywhere, this is as close as I've got so far (Kelvin Hall at bottom right)
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby elgee » Tue Nov 27, 2007 11:11 pm

[quote]Society of Friends
Burial Ground

Gifted by

John Purdon 1711

Last used 11-X11-1857

The Quakers gifted the site to Partick, and a part was used for road building-in return for the site being kept in good order (which it appears to be) - and for 1s a year being donated to the Society of Friends. Does the Kooncil still pay the 5p? Apparently Purdon's wife was the first interred in the cemetery, and the family, which was a prominent one in eighteenth century Partick, is commemorated in neighbouring Purdon Street.[/quote]

This is fairly near to Dunaskin St., is this the burial ground referred to ? The Quaker site is very small, too small IMO , Why would anbody enclose such a small site and call it a burial ground for Quakers in Glasgow ? the Societyy of Friends has long been active and fairly popular in Glasgow. The "and a part was used for road building- in the return for the site being kept in good order"...... suggests it may have been larger graveyard which perhaps was nearer to Dunask St.
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby Lone Groover » Wed Nov 28, 2007 7:40 am

Recent pics of the grave yard, off Purdon St. Don't think that is the one below Dunaskin St.
Hollowhorns pic of that part of town is very good.

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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby HollowHorn » Wed Nov 28, 2007 6:07 pm

Groover, there are another couple of photos of the area which I'm sure you have already seen. I'll post them though for the sake of completeness:
Taken from the University tower in 1905 by T. & R. Annan
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Yorkhill Hospital has yet to be built. The area of land to the left of the river at centre was called 'Bunhouse Grounds' and is now occupied by the Kelvin Hall and Museum of Transport. To the right, either side of the River Kelvin, are Regent and Scotstoun Mills. Mills had been established in Partick for hundreds of years and those along the Kelvin produced a wide variety of material such as flint, timber and paper.
http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/exhibns/mo ... e2004.html

Does a Flint Mill suggest a quarry in the area?

Partick Central Station looking east, 1955. Castlebank Street is on the left, the station in the centre and the River Kelvin on the right of the photograph. The distinctive tower of the University of Glasgow is on the skyline.
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Partick Central Station was built by the Lanarkshire & Dumbartonshire Railway Co in the 1890s. The railway line ran along the north bank of the Clyde, from Stobcross to Dumbarton via bustling industrial centres such as Scotsoun, Yoker, Clydebank and Bowling. The station was renamed Kelvin Hall in 1959. Passenger and general goods services ceased in 1964 but the sidings remained open until 1978 serving an oil depot and scrap metal merchant. The station building on the road bridge became a workshop and then an auction hall, and the goods yard served as a site for travelling people. In 2004 there are plans to build a supermarket there.
http://www.theglasgowstory.com/


As for the graveyard in Purdon St. Do you not feel that is too far away from Dunaskin St. to be the one you mentioned?
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby Schiehallion » Wed Nov 28, 2007 7:30 pm

Lone Groover wrote:This road was also known as "The Quarry" - We don't know why.


This is from the 1857 ordnance survey map.

Newton Street (Dunaskin St) is at the bottom left with Queen St running up to Dumbarton Road. Go along Dumbarton Road towards Partick Bridge and there's an 'Old Quarry' in the wooded area with another quarry to the north.

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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby HollowHorn » Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:59 pm

Interesting that you should show quarries in that particular location, I found the below information last night but could not find an exact location for the quarry:

Ancient Urns.—In 1832, seven of these were found by some
workmen, when baring the surface of a quarry near Partick, on the
property of Mr Bogle of Gilmorehill. One was broken by the
workmen before they knew what it was. The other six were found
on the two succeeding days. They were not more than three feet
below the surface of the ground, and placed within a few feet of
one another. Some of them are 14 inches high, 10 inches in diameter
at the top, and 4 inches at the bottom. The others are
smaller, but of the same form. The fragments of bones which
were found in them were placed irregularly one above the other.
They contained likewise a small portion of hair.

Clicky


And:

In 1868 a small group of fossilised trees was uncovered at Gilmorehill - just a few hundred yards away from where I am sitting now writing this - in the heart of the West End. They where discovered during the quarrying for the Glasgow University building but sebsequent quarrying unfortunately destroyed the fossils. Information for this page was obtained from Alastair Gunnings great little book 'The Fossil Grove' published by Glasgow Museums.
http://www.glasgowwestend.co.uk/out/gal ... silgv.html

I wonder if there is a connection, your map location of the quarries seems pretty close to Gilmorehill?
And as to Newton / Dunaskin St. being called 'The Quarry' Perhaps this was a nickname used by the workers traveling to & from the Quarries at Gilmorehill?

it was really in dunaskin Sreet " commonly known as the " Quarry"
http://discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/lofiv ... p/f65.html



Again, as to Newton / Dunaskin St. being built on an old graveyard, There is a church (old St. Peter's RC) located just behind it in Partick Bridge St, did it have a burial ground? Perhaps the church itself was built on older consecrated ground? When was Newton St. built?
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A postcard view of St Peter's Church (now St Simon's) in Bridge Street, Partick, c 1900. The priest's house is to the left and the end of the school building can be seen on the other side of the church (Newton / Dunaskin St. to the rear?):
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http://www.theglasgowstory.com/image.php?inum=TGSA00618

Curiously St Simon's Church used to be called St Peter's. It was founded in 1855 by Fr Daniel Gallaugher, famous as the priest who taught David Livingstone Latin. He had been asked to build a church in the West End of Glasgow which he completed in (Partick) Bridge St in 1858, calling it St Peter's. He died in 1885 and is buried in Greenock.
By the end of the century the little church was not big enough and a large new one was built by Pugin on the other side of Dumbarton Rd in Hyndland St. This was opened in 1903 and the original church was left closed for about 10 years after which it was used as a parish hall for some time. It reopened as a chapel of ease for Sunday Mass in 1923 and was thereafter referred to simply as "the Bridge St Chapel".
Immediately after the Second World War the Archdiocese of Glasgow, responding to population increase, was opening many new parishes. A site was sought for the south side of Dumbarton Rd in the Yorkhill area. When this proved impossible the decision was taken to reopen the Bridge St building as a parish in its own right with the title St Simon's. The date of erection of the parish is 12 April 1946 and Rev Thomas Egan was officially appointed parish priest 18 May. After 2 years he was succeeded by Fr George Aylward who was replaced in 1950 by Fr Donal Robertson, curate in St Peter's.
When Fr Robertson died in 1972 all the surrounding tenements had been demolished and the Archdiocese again considered closing the building. However the diocesan archivist, Fr Patrick Tierney, had been himself a parishioner of St Simon's and he volunteered to restore it. He also invited back the Polish Chaplaincy which had used it during the World War 2 for the Polish Free Army stationed in Yorkhill Barracks. Fr Tierney died in 1993 and was replaced by Fr John Chalmers.
During the following decade the future of the church was yet again questioned as the area was renovated with expensive new flats. However some of these were carefully designed around the old building which again is undergoing restoration.
http://www.stsimonspartick.org.uk/
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby HollowHorn » Sun Dec 02, 2007 10:48 pm

I think I've found the 'Quarry' ::):
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby Basingoose » Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:29 pm

Finding this post has really cheered me up.
My grandparents lived in Dunaskin Street ( Newton Street ) at the end of the 19th Century, beginning of the 20th. They were married in St Peter's ( St Simon's ) in 1902.
I have been trying for ages to find more info about the area, and like some of the other members a pic of what Newton Street looked like... Someone out there must have taken some shots of the street before it was pulled down. :D
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Re: Dunaskin Street

Postby Frank Hughes » Thu Jul 18, 2019 8:11 am

I lived just round the corner from Dunaskin Street at 68 Partick Bridge Street (1957-1970 when it was demolished). I spent many happy hours playing in the swing park in Dunaskin Street. It has since had new flats built on it. Does anyone have pictures of the swing park from the 1960s?
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