Live music in Glasgow

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Live music in Glasgow

Postby dimairt » Thu Feb 13, 2014 6:25 pm

Just back from an overnight stay in Edinburgh. We went to the Jazz Bar to see the Steve Fishwick Quintet - niiiiiice! This venue puts on three, four, sometimes five gigs a night and charges at the door - it was £8 for the Quintet and there were about 80-100 people there.
I wonder though why there's nothing like it in Glasgow. Is it still 'illegal' to charge for live music in the City's pubs? I understand that this was due to an old bye-law going back to the music-hall era that was never rescinded.
Glasgow trumpets - no pun intended - its status as an UNESCO City of Music but there are often times when there's bugger all on. Edinburgh, with a smaller population, can sustain the Jazz Bar - among other venues - so why not here?
Answers on a postcard please in 9/8 time.

Durachdan,

Eddy

http://www.thejazzbar.co.uk/
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby edward carolan » Thu Feb 13, 2014 9:00 pm

If you e-mail Bridge Jazz bill@bridgejazz.co.uk , he will put you on the mailing list for the Glasgow performances. Thursday @ 8:00pm at the Glasgow Art Club.
These great gigs are staged by non-profit organisation Bridge Music, in Glasgow Art Club, 185 Bath St (at Blythswood St).
All gigs start just after 8pm, and present two one-hour sets of excellent music.
Steve Fishwick is playing tonight.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby dimairt » Fri Feb 14, 2014 5:56 pm

Thanks for that Edward, I'll do just that. I've been to the venue for Celtic Connections gigs - it's good. My point though wasn't just about jazz: I like music, especially live and there's often a dearth of it in Glasgow.


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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby Dexter St. Clair » Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:43 pm

Music, uncurtained windows , comfortable seating and enjoying yourself were frowned upon and the introduction of the Licensing Hours act and Dry Areas gave local councillors the opportunity to embody those thoughts in the law. Whilst some of you have a fairly romantic view of the old Labour Party they were of the belief that alcohol was the demon of the working classes and of course the Licensing Board attracted the Pioneers, Abstainers and the Temperance League. Things gradually eased and in the sixties one could see entertainment in bars.

Public houses could not charge for entry as they were supposed to be open to all of the public. However if they had a lounge or other room the public could drink in the bar and private functions could be held in the lounge. They were supposed to be ticket only and tickets had to be purchase in advance not on the door. This of course led to promoters selling tickets at the entrance of a nearby close. That might still be roughly the current law but in certain areas of the city what would normally be regarded as bars with a lounge have entertainments licenses and can therefore charge at the door. Most of them are in Sauchiehall Street and Bath Street. One of them is the Slouch bar and it's free to get in on jazz nights.

Glaswegians prefer to hand over several twenty pound notes to see has beens and next to be has beens and prefer not to pay to see anyone who could be regarded as local musician.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby dimairt » Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:53 pm

Thanks for that Dex. I note your point about handing over loadsamoney to see big names, I think it was ever that way. At the Maryland in the '60s it was usual for the local support act to be ignored with the audience turning their back to them while waiting to see and laud some second-division act from London.
I was involved in organising gigs in Cumbernauld between '75-'81 and it was often a real slog drumming up an audience for the groups we put on. We usually went for three or four acts, one or two of them local, different styles, good venue and some decent advertising but i don't recall getting much more than 150 at best.
I was struck though by the Jazz Bar's approach - incidentally, it's the same people putting on jazz at the Art club - and I wonder if charging at the door would bring in more cash for the musicians , local and touring, and give music-hungry punters the chance to see and hear them.
I've had a wee look at this internet thing in the meantime and note that there are some groups on in Blackfriars this week and will probably go for Domino Gumbo on Sunday.

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Eddy
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby RDR » Sat Feb 15, 2014 10:49 am

Dexter St. Clair wrote:Music, uncurtained windows , comfortable seating and enjoying yourself were frowned upon and the introduction of the Licensing Hours act and Dry Areas gave local councillors the opportunity to embody those thoughts in the law. Whilst some of you have a fairly romantic view of the old Labour Party they were of the belief that alcohol was the demon of the working classes and of course the Licensing Board attracted the Pioneers, Abstainers and the Temperance League. Things gradually eased and in the sixties one could see entertainment in bars.

Public houses could not charge for entry as they were supposed to be open to all of the public. However if they had a lounge or other room the public could drink in the bar and private functions could be held in the lounge. They were supposed to be ticket only and tickets had to be purchase in advance not on the door. This of course led to promoters selling tickets at the entrance of a nearby close. That might still be roughly the current law but in certain areas of the city what would normally be regarded as bars with a lounge have entertainments licenses and can therefore charge at the door. Most of them are in Sauchiehall Street and Bath Street. One of them is the Slouch bar and it's free to get in on jazz nights.

Glaswegians prefer to hand over several twenty pound notes to see has beens and next to be has beens and prefer not to pay to see anyone who could be regarded as local musician.


I wanted to pick up on the above from Dex. I remain bewildered about the current public obsession with 'tribute' acts (we get lots at Motherwell Concert Hall) or 'talent shows' (I use the term loosely) where singers cover old songs (or in most cases murder them) rather than pay to go and see new local talent who actually write and play their own material.
If you want to hear the real Led Zepplin (or Abba god forbid) then just buy their CD's or download them.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby banjo » Sat Feb 15, 2014 11:20 am

mojo switch live in the lovat arms on sunday night.free of charge.decent wee pub with affordable food /drink.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby Josef » Sat Feb 15, 2014 4:47 pm

RDR wrote:
Dexter St. Clair wrote:Music, uncurtained windows , comfortable seating and enjoying yourself were frowned upon and the introduction of the Licensing Hours act and Dry Areas gave local councillors the opportunity to embody those thoughts in the law. Whilst some of you have a fairly romantic view of the old Labour Party they were of the belief that alcohol was the demon of the working classes and of course the Licensing Board attracted the Pioneers, Abstainers and the Temperance League. Things gradually eased and in the sixties one could see entertainment in bars.

Public houses could not charge for entry as they were supposed to be open to all of the public. However if they had a lounge or other room the public could drink in the bar and private functions could be held in the lounge. They were supposed to be ticket only and tickets had to be purchase in advance not on the door. This of course led to promoters selling tickets at the entrance of a nearby close. That might still be roughly the current law but in certain areas of the city what would normally be regarded as bars with a lounge have entertainments licenses and can therefore charge at the door. Most of them are in Sauchiehall Street and Bath Street. One of them is the Slouch bar and it's free to get in on jazz nights.

Glaswegians prefer to hand over several twenty pound notes to see has beens and next to be has beens and prefer not to pay to see anyone who could be regarded as local musician.


I wanted to pick up on the above from Dex. I remain bewildered about the current public obsession with 'tribute' acts (we get lots at Motherwell Concert Hall) or 'talent shows' (I use the term loosely) where singers cover old songs (or in most cases murder them) rather than pay to go and see new local talent who actually write and play their own material.
If you want to hear the real Led Zepplin (or Abba god forbid) then just buy their CD's or download them.


Och, come on sir. You must have seen Saturday night tv at some point in the last 40 years.

People over the age of (roughly) 30, by and large, want unchallenging stuff. Stuff they've heard or seen before. It's the reason why, a decade or so ago, you'll have found people saying "Have you heard Radio 2 recently? They're playing really good stuff these days!".

As to the buying the cd : people clearly still like to have the live music experience. They've got sod-all chance of seeing such megabands live (they're either not there anymore or prohibitively expensive). And anyway, I'm told that several of the tribute bands are actually better live than the band the pay tribute to.

Although possibly not in Motherwell. I did once work in Motherwell Civic Centre, btw - I retain fond memories of it.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby The Egg Man » Sat Feb 15, 2014 4:57 pm

I believe Motherwell Civic Centre is cheap to hire, has good parking nearby and good motorway connections to a huge population.
I hear the people sing.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby Josef » Sat Feb 15, 2014 5:15 pm

The Egg Man wrote:I believe Motherwell Civic Centre is cheap to hire, has good parking nearby and good motorway connections to a huge population.


Sounds about right. As I recall, it has decent acoustics too. It's underrated. Although that goes without saying, given that it's not in Glasgow or the capital.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby RDR » Sat Feb 15, 2014 8:21 pm

Josef wrote:
The Egg Man wrote:I believe Motherwell Civic Centre is cheap to hire, has good parking nearby and good motorway connections to a huge population.


Sounds about right. As I recall, it has decent acoustics too. It's underrated. Although that goes without saying, given that it's not in Glasgow or the capital.


It's a decent venue and It has recently been refurbished.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby RDR » Sat Feb 15, 2014 8:26 pm

Josef wrote:
RDR wrote:
Dexter St. Clair wrote:Music, uncurtained windows , comfortable seating and enjoying yourself were frowned upon and the introduction of the Licensing Hours act and Dry Areas gave local councillors the opportunity to embody those thoughts in the law. Whilst some of you have a fairly romantic view of the old Labour Party they were of the belief that alcohol was the demon of the working classes and of course the Licensing Board attracted the Pioneers, Abstainers and the Temperance League. Things gradually eased and in the sixties one could see entertainment in bars.

Public houses could not charge for entry as they were supposed to be open to all of the public. However if they had a lounge or other room the public could drink in the bar and private functions could be held in the lounge. They were supposed to be ticket only and tickets had to be purchase in advance not on the door. This of course led to promoters selling tickets at the entrance of a nearby close. That might still be roughly the current law but in certain areas of the city what would normally be regarded as bars with a lounge have entertainments licenses and can therefore charge at the door. Most of them are in Sauchiehall Street and Bath Street. One of them is the Slouch bar and it's free to get in on jazz nights.

Glaswegians prefer to hand over several twenty pound notes to see has beens and next to be has beens and prefer not to pay to see anyone who could be regarded as local musician.


I wanted to pick up on the above from Dex. I remain bewildered about the current public obsession with 'tribute' acts (we get lots at Motherwell Concert Hall) or 'talent shows' (I use the term loosely) where singers cover old songs (or in most cases murder them) rather than pay to go and see new local talent who actually write and play their own material.
If you want to hear the real Led Zepplin (or Abba god forbid) then just buy their CD's or download them.


Och, come on sir. You must have seen Saturday night tv at some point in the last 40 years.

People over the age of (roughly) 30, by and large, want unchallenging stuff. Stuff they've heard or seen before. It's the reason why, a decade or so ago, you'll have found people saying "Have you heard Radio 2 recently? They're playing really good stuff these days!".

As to the buying the cd : people clearly still like to have the live music experience. They've got sod-all chance of seeing such megabands live (they're either not there anymore or prohibitively expensive). And anyway, I'm told that several of the tribute bands are actually better live than the band the pay tribute to.

Although possibly not in Motherwell. I did once work in Motherwell Civic Centre, btw - I retain fond memories of it.


I'm well over 30 and still want to look for new stuff as well as to listen to music from the past.
Plenty of the tribute bands are perfectly competent, just a pity they don't want to stretch themselves and do something original. Easy money I suppose.
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Re: Live music in Glasgow

Postby HelenD » Sat Feb 15, 2014 11:01 pm

RDR wrote:Plenty of the tribute bands are perfectly competent, just a pity they don't want to stretch themselves and do something original. Easy money I suppose.

I thnk the point of a tribute act is that they play the album live so that everything's familiar to the audience. Those who write their own material (and wouldn't be a tribute act by definition) tend to tinker with their live set to the frustration of those who just want to listen to what they bought the previous week in HMV. Most original bands start out by playing covers and gradually working their own material into the set.

Extreme are playing the O2 Academy in July. This is causing me difficulty. It's walking distance and their playing what I regard to be an essential element of any self-respecting rock musician's collection. Pornograffitti. I remember a friend of mine being really troubled by one of Bettencourt's solos and I'd like to see how it's done.

I'm not keen on paying thirty-five pounds, though, knowing what the ambience of these gigs tends to be like. I'd probably be better off staying at home, listening to the CD on headphones.
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