The Heart Of Glasgow - Glasgow's Eight Oldest Streets

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Postby crusty_bint » Sat Oct 21, 2006 5:06 pm

Remains of the Bishops palace/castle

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here i go, it's coming for me through the trees
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Postby doonunda » Tue Oct 24, 2006 12:06 pm

ft
Last edited by doonunda on Fri Feb 16, 2007 11:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby John » Tue Oct 24, 2006 1:25 pm

doonunda wrote:Superb mate, I love that stuff. I'm sure I read somewhere that masonry from the palace/ castle was used in the construction of the first royal infirmary. Do you know that's true or not?


From my copy of Lost Glasgow.

"The ruins of the Castle were cleared away in 1792 to make way for Robert Adam's Royal Infirmary".

The use of cleared away suggests no reuse of stone.

Lost Glasgow by Carol Foreman is a great read.

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Old College Bar

Postby Alex Glass » Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:39 pm

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Re: Old College Bar

Postby John » Fri Oct 27, 2006 11:39 pm

Alex Glass wrote:Image


Lovely shot Alex. You have captured my favourite street corner in the whole of Glasgow at the corner of High Street and Nicholas Street which has such an interesting historical past.

Here is a small taster from me:

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I am working on the project plan and have a map with lots of notes. Work is busy for the next 10 days but I plan to take a few weeks off after then and will kickstart this project with a few photowalks.

Thanks

W
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Postby DickyHart » Sat Oct 28, 2006 12:10 am

this is my favourite bit in glasgow, love the atmosphere, and the buildings that are there. by the way the college bar is a nice friendly welcome.
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Postby Dexter St. Clair » Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:02 am

The Sing a Long in TheCollege Bar on a Friday night partivcularly when you realise the 11:30 train no longer runs and rather than head back to McChuills you can pop accross to the Colege before the 11:45 arrives.

The old Fruit Shop across the lane has an application for a refreshment license slapped on it. Some sort of cafe I presume.
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Postby John » Thu Nov 16, 2006 9:57 pm

The Drygate is undoubtedly the oldest thoroughfare in the city. In Jamieson's history of the Culdees it is stated that the Pagans brought the word dry from Germany, as being the name by which every German priest was called. In ancient times, anterior to our ecclesiastical history, a Druidical place of worship stood on the site of the present Necropolis, the only-approach to which must have been the Drygate, hence it was designated the priests' road. A mint-house was erected here during the reign of Robert the Third.

TEXT FROM JACK HOUSE

Straight across from the Rotterrow is the Drygate which was once a Roman Road. Duke Street Prison dominated the Drygate for many years. Now there is the housing complex, and its pillared entrance with the Cathedral Square opposite.

When you cross John Knox Street, you find that the rest of the Drygate, which led over the Molendinar Burd to the Lady's Well, has been reduced to a short cul-de-sac, for the gigantic Tennent's Brewery reached out over the Molendinar and swallowed up part of the ancient history of Glasgow.

The Drygate was the place where such great lords as the Dukes of Montrose had their town houses. One of the first bridges in Glasgow was build over the Molendinar Burn here.

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Last edited by John on Fri Nov 17, 2006 10:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby John » Fri Nov 17, 2006 12:07 am

Today I went in search of the Drygate, famed as the earliest thoroughfare in Glasgow. It is not easy to find as the modern development has chopped it off from the High Street.

It should be somewhere around here:


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Now where is it?

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This doesn't look very promising:

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I am onto something here:

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At last here is the Drygate:

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Nice view of the city:

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There's not much else to see though. The history of this area is well hidden.

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It does have a certain charm though and I am thrilled to have stood on the spot where the city started.

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Postby John » Fri Nov 17, 2006 1:32 pm

Saltmarket.

Oliver Cromwell stayed here when he occupied Glasgow, Provost Bell lived here and King James VII lived in Provost Bell's house at one time.

Apparently named after a market whick sold salt. Salmon were cured nearby where the Molendinar joined the Clyde.

The area between the Saltmarket and Stockwell Street was one of the most densely packed areas of Glasgow.

The area was forever changed by the coming of the railway.

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Postby John » Fri Nov 17, 2006 1:35 pm

A' The Comforts O' The Sautmarket.

You can buy a suit in the City Cash Tailors where it is business as usual apparently.

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Then cross the road for a pint and a half in the Empire Bar.

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Postby John » Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:30 pm

DickyHart wrote:this is my favourite bit in glasgow, love the atmosphere, and the buildings that are there. by the way the college bar is a nice friendly welcome.


I really fancy a visit to the College Bar. Why don't we have a future HG drinks night there?

W
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Postby My Kitten » Fri Nov 17, 2006 9:39 pm

walbass wrote:
DickyHart wrote:this is my favourite bit in glasgow, love the atmosphere, and the buildings that are there. by the way the college bar is a nice friendly welcome.


I really fancy a visit to the College Bar. Why don't we have a future HG drinks night there?

W

aye cracking pub in there, had a good few nights in there. Id support that
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Postby John » Fri Nov 17, 2006 9:57 pm

My Kitten wrote:
walbass wrote:
DickyHart wrote:this is my favourite bit in glasgow, love the atmosphere, and the buildings that are there. by the way the college bar is a nice friendly welcome.


I really fancy a visit to the College Bar. Why don't we have a future HG drinks night there?

W

aye cracking pub in there, had a good few nights in there. Id support that


Could be a possible venue for HG xmas drinks :?:
'It's a sad day for capitalism when a man can't fly a midget on a kite over Central Park'
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Postby John » Sun Nov 19, 2006 3:02 pm

Looking down Saltmarket from Glasgow Cross. All human life is here.....

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