Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby kiwi2 » Thu Jun 25, 2009 10:23 am

Hi Carol-Anne,

Sorry for the delay in answering your request for details of me, my name is Ron Little and I went to Levern Primary and also like yourself was in the first intake to Craigbank Sec.

Some of the pupils I can remember who came from Roughmussell were Valerie Ashmore. Noreen Roberts, John Sheath, Alan King, Alan Campbell, memory lets me down for more names.

I came out to NZ in 1970 and now live in Dunedin.

Sad to see Craigbank school no longer exists in name and also the original houses in Craigbank have recently been demolished and rebuilt, no doubt they call it progress.

I believe Roughmussell is still intact, did you live near 89 Kinarvie cresc. as I had an uncle who lived there for many years.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby leverngirl » Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:55 pm

holy moses, no posts since July. Maybe no more interest in Craigbank....and apart from those who were there between 1950 and ...when?.. last year ? ......why should there be......it was a place that existed for a short period of time, and even within that time, people in the early years would have had a very different experience of the place from those who lived there in its dying ones. When I lived there in the 50's , for example, Newfield Square had a tennis court and a bowling green, and in the summer, was full of life ; when I went there again, out of curiosity, in the 90's, the square was just a dump.
Sad, but life.
There will, no doubt, be new houses there, with new people to write their own stories, their own history. And that's good.
But it would still be interesting to hear some memories.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby curly sue » Wed Dec 23, 2009 12:39 am

Hi everyone,
Just Stopping by to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and fantastic New Year :D
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby WeeTomA » Fri Jan 01, 2010 11:22 pm

Hi Everyone. I would like to wish you all A very Happy New Year. I was born and raised in South Pollok and went to Gowanbank Primary from 1955 to 1962 and also worked at Scotcel in South Nitshill from 1969 until 1976. I have just spent the last couple of hours reading all 19 pages here and it has brought 100's of great memories. Thank you to all who have contibuted.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby Autolycus » Tue Jan 05, 2010 7:56 pm

peejay1312 wrote:in response to curly sue the old chapel hall i remember when i was young going to a disco after my confirmation at st roberts, i remember fr burke and fr nugent (ex priest now) also i remember when i was at bellarmine i was in hte bellarmine beasties (any1 rememebr them????) and we cleaned up the surrounding area my that was a long time ago a blaast from the paast haha



Gerry Nugent was found dead this morning by his housekeeper. Suspected heart attack.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby Dexter St. Clair » Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:45 am

End of an era

Cavendish loses licence over weapons

A Glasgow pub has become the first in Scotland to be permanently shut under new liquor laws after police discovered an arsenal of 29 hidden weapons while investigating the violent death of a customer.

Knives, swords, machetes, hammers, axes and baseball bats were found in the Caven­dish Bar after the death of a 45-year-old man in January, prompting Strathclyde Police to call for a review of the venue’s licence. A 41-year-old member of the Cavendish’s staff is awaiting trial.


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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby banjo » Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:45 pm

what did they do in that place,search you on the way in and if you did not have a weapon you were turned away.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby fourbytwo » Wed Mar 10, 2010 8:56 am

::): I think you would be deeply disturbed if you were to check almost any local pub, just what is kept behind the counter.....to help with mice..!
Also remember, that staff have been assaulted with a variety of 'weapons', and if you check the article complete, you will see things like craft knives, and other knives (that could be for spreading peeces), so as much as a list may look quite dreadful, there are items we all use on a daily basis that 'poleece' would say was an offensive weapon.
That's not to say that having several baseball bats handy, may seem a bit 'sporty', but I have worked behind some bars in the East End, where some of the 'weapon stock' would be happy in 'Braveheart'....
Horses for Courses..... :wink:
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby banjo » Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:37 pm

i wonder just how many baseballs or baseball gloves have been sold in glasgow in proportion to bats.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby fourbytwo » Thu Mar 11, 2010 10:34 am

::): Let me tell you.....I worked in a city centre pub, that had items hidden behind counters that you might have thought had shares in Victor Morris, swords, daggers, knuckle dusters and other associated 'ornaments'....and this is an up-market venue that successfully disguises its origins, and has become 'trendy'.... ::):
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby georgehenry » Wed May 26, 2010 8:06 am

Hi all have just found this site. Lived in newfield sq and went to levern primary in the 50's. Used to play in levern burn and the red hills as well as collecting chestnuts from coate's woods. Showed my kids newfield sq on google last year and now it is all gone like levern school. My son's girlfriend took a video of pinmore st where my relatives lived and i spent every weekend and put in on utube - cannot believe the changes - the manse is all gone and the big hoose behind number 42 is gone as well - anyone out there rember any of these places?
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby onyir » Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:34 am

Does anyone know if the old Annex school is stilkl standing near the roundabout?
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby darnleygirl » Wed Sep 01, 2010 8:48 pm

hi again alex sorry its took me so long to get bak here and check!! jus wanted to say thanks for puttin those pics on the one in the coridor is fantastic :D and the open space darnley one is a cracker :o i can see the old play scheme! jus tryin to get some stuff together to show my son when hes older about the place i grew up in and that hes growin up in now i really do love darnley :) thanx again if you find ne thing else give me a shout!!

tracy xxx :D
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby Methane » Wed Sep 08, 2010 5:34 pm

Hi. Re the Central Heating Plant in Nitshill. This was managed by My Uncle Pat McLaughlin who stayed at 35 Newfield Square. Although we stayed in Anderston I would come over on a Number 48 bus. I spent many happy hours playing in and around the square as well as in the burn. Here is a wee story about 'The Plant'.

Great photos by the way.

Michael Meighan

At Newfield Square we looked over a bowling green and tennis court. On the long hot summer days we sat in deckchairs as on a steamer and listened to the plip plop of tennis balls, claps from the older people on the bowling green and general noises from the children in the roads round the square which was very free from traffic at that time. And incongruously I remember regular visits from a rag and bone man, complete with horse and cart. He would make his way round the square giving away inflated balloons in exchange for old clothes and jam jars.

While we are still in Nitshill, a word about my Uncle Pat who stayed in the roomy top floor flat at 35 Newfield Square along with Aunty Polly and my two cousins, Raymond and Gerald. Probably for my mother’s health, I would be pushed off to Nitshill for the weekend, or prolonged periods, in the summer.

Now as I have said, Nitshill was centrally heated from a boiler plant and my uncle was the plant engineer. This was a very important position and he, once or twice would take me with him at a weekend to check that all was well with the three huge marine boilers. Now these boilers were coke-fired just like the ones that heated the swimming pool at Hydepark but I do remember the difference. The boiler-room was spotless and dust-free as far as I can remember. The big boiler-room was light and airy and there was a little glassed-in office for Uncle Pat.

Of course, He didn’t have to go up to ‘The Plant’. He only had to feel the heat in the radiators to know that the plant was working efficiently. Now I was used to him doing this with regularity and you would get used to his commitment to ensuring that the thousands of people in the scheme were kept cosy. However, one night, he did feel the radiator and it was cold. He then went to other radiators in the flat to check if it was maybe just the one in the living room. But no, there was no heat. So, in his position, he had one of those big black Bakelite telephones but with the little drawer underneath where you could keep telephone numbers. As far as I remember, my aunt and uncle were the only people that I knew that actually had a telephone albeit that it was on a party line, which is shared with other people. If you picked up the phone and heard talking you had to get off till they had finished.

Anyway he phoned the plant and nothing. There was no response.
‘I’ll better away up and see what the problem is he said’. ‘Can I come’, I said.

‘He looked at me and said ‘come on then, not anticipating that it would be anything other than a breakdown about which he should have been informed.
So we got on our coats and hurried up to the plant that was about two streets away, up the hill.

We walked into the building and past two of the big marine boilers that were stone cold. I could hear voices coming from the little cabin and there, sitting round Uncle Pat’s desk were the two stokers, rolling drunk with at least one bottle on the table in front of them.

He looked at them till they turned and finally took notice. It was like Burns: 'The moments whiled away wi’ pleasure…. '

While his coat was coming off and his sleeves were getting rolled up, he turned to me and said: get away back to the house and tell your auntie about this and that I will be some time. If the boys are there send them up. I must say, Uncle Pat I remember being amongst the most placid of men but I am glad I wasn’t there to see what he thought of them that night.

There is a confusion about working class heroes and what working class actually is, or was. Uncle Pat was a plant manager, but also a lifelong trades union member and official who would take me to the May Day Rally and I would be on the Boilermakers float as it made its way through the town ‘Up Sauchie, doon Buchie and along Argyle’ and over the bridge to Queens Park where there would be the Labour Party May Day rally. At that time there didn’t seem to be a distinction between manager and worker. You were all working class and in many cases, those who had bettered themselves through education to become managers and teachers were highly respected.

Working class meant working and usually working hard. It had nothing to do with needing handouts or sympathy. It had everything to do with the dignity of work and the need for equality and parity with others, rights to work and rights to education. Uncle Pat was the only one I knew that was in a Trades Union as far as I can remember and while everyone around me I suppose made me a socialist, he made me a trade’s unionist.
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Re: Pollok, Househill and Hurlet

Postby minxy » Sat Sep 11, 2010 6:21 pm

Very nice read Methane, brought back many memories of when I used to play the puttng there.
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